Army seeks to develop reduced-range rocket for training and qualification of HIMARS and MLRS artillery crews

Nov. 2, 2023
Rapid-development project seeks to develop a working prototype training weapon that can be fired M270 MLRS or M142 HIMARS launchers no later than 2028.

REDSTONE ARSENAL, Ala. – U.S. Army fire-support experts are reaching out to industry for companies able to develop and prototype a reduced-range rocket for training and qualification of Multiple-Launch Rocket System (MLRS) crews.

Officials of the Army Contracting command at Redstone Arsenal, Ala., issued a sources-sought notice (PANRSA23P0000016158) on Monday for the Joint Reduced Range Rocket project to develop a surface-to-surface, live fire, qualification rocket.

Army leaders want a new Multiple Launch Rocket System (MLRS) family of munitions Joint Reduced Range Rocket (JR3), which would be an all-up round prototype to help MLRS and High Mobility Artillery Rocket System (HIMARS) crews perform live-fire training in different environmental conditions during the day or at night.

Related: Lockheed Martin to build artillery launchers for extended-range smart munitions in $476.8 million deal

This rapid-development project seeks to develop a working prototype training weapon that can be fired M270 MLRS or M142 HIMARS launchers no later than 2028. Today's MLRS and HIMARS manufacturers are Lockheed Martin Corp. and BAE Systems.

Companies interested should be able to describe the technology readiness level (TRL) and manufacturing readiness level (MRL) of the proposed training munition and its key subsystems such as guidance and sensor mechanisms; propulsion; datalink; safe, arm, and fire device; and other subsystems.

The proposed training rocket should have a range of between six and 10 miles, and be able to fly a normal trajectory over friendly troops with a near-precision impact of about 80 to 100 feet of its targeted point.

Related: Lockheed Martin to build HIMARS missile launchers to send multimode seeker munitions to their targets

The JR3 also should be able to use current and future Advanced Field Artillery Tactical Data System (FADS) and launcher software, and should be designed with a Modular Open Systems Architecture (MOSA) interface between the motor and the warhead to allow for future growth without designing a new munition.

Companies interested should email responses no later than 8 Dec. 2023 to the Army's Mica Clemens at [email protected] and to Kyle Teegarden at [email protected].

Email questions or concerns to the Army's Lindsay Jennings at [email protected] or Monica Clemons at [email protected]. More information is online at https://sam.gov/opp/16365f916ace41e39fe848cf272b5ee4/view.

Voice your opinion!

To join the conversation, and become an exclusive member of Military Aerospace, create an account today!