C4ISR spending to remain stable over next five years, led by sensors and UAVs, says Frost & Sullivan

MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif., 18 Nov. 2011. U.S. military spending for command, control, communications, computers, intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (C4ISR) will remain stable through 2016, with substantial growth limited to applications involving counter-insurgency and counter-terror operations, say analysts at market researcher Frost & Sullivan in Mountain View, Calif. The focus of C4ISR spending over the next five years will be on intelligence and special operations repair, maintenance, training, information assurance, and operational services, Frost & Sullivan analysts say in their report entitled U.S. DOD C4ISR Markets.

Nov 18th, 2011



MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif., 18 Nov. 2011. U.S. military spending for command, control, communications, computers, intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (C4ISR) will remain stable through 2016, with substantial growth limited to applications involving counter-insurgency and counter-terrorism operations, say analysts at market researcher Frost & Sullivan in Mountain View, Calif.

The focus of C4ISR spending over the next five years will be on intelligence and special operations repair, maintenance, training, information assurance, and operational services, Frost & Sullivan analysts say in their report entitled U.S. DOD C4ISR Markets.

Over the next five years C4ISR spending in the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) will account for 6.5 percent of the total DOD budget, Frost & Sullivan analysts say. One bright spot for military spending through 2016 is surveillance and reconnaissance (S&R), as unmanned vehicles and improved sensors are deployed.

DOD spending over the next five years for research, development, test, and evaluation (RDT&E) will be reduced, as export controls constrain international sales and commercial and foreign competition grows, analysts say.

Electronic warfare and information operations should have the fastest growth rate through 2016, Frost & Sullivan analysts say. For more information contact Frost & Sullivan online at www.frost.com.

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