Need for precision strike expected to drive slow-but-steady growth in military GNSS market

LONDON, 25 April 2014. The global market for military global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) will grow 1.1 percent annually through 2022, and rise from $1.98 billion in 2013 to $2.18 billion in 2022, predict analysts at market researcher Frost & Sullivan in London.

Slow-but-steady growth expected in GNSS market
Slow-but-steady growth expected in GNSS market
LONDON, 25 April 2014. The global market for military global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) will grow 1.1 percent annually through 2022, and rise from $1.98 billion in 2013 to $2.18 billion in 2022, predict analysts at market researcher Frost & Sullivan in London.

Driving the military GNSS market are ongoing operations, force modernization efforts, and the rising importance of precision strike in contemporary military conflicts, analysts say. One strike of a 155-millimeter GNSS-guided artillery shell can cause more impact than a dozen unguided rounds, analysts say, which points out the military importance of GNSS technology.

North America is the biggest market for military GNSS while Central Asia, Asia-Pacific, and the Middle East represent the fastest growing markets, analysts say.

Frost & Sullivan researchers detail their GNSS findings in a report entitled Military Global Navigation Satellite Systems Market Assessment. The study covers receivers, data applications, and services.

Related: Satellite navigation turns artillery shells into precision-strike weapons: the Mil & Aero video blog

Major military GNSS programs worldwide are increasing the availability of satellite navigation. Projects include the European Galileo and Chinese Beidou/Compass, and the introduction of two new regional navigational systems -- Indian Regional Navigational Satellite System and the Japanese Quasi-Zenith Satellite System.

These new developments also are intensifying competition between GNSS providers, and are lowering the cost of GNSS capabilities and attracting more end users, Frost & Sullivan analysts say.

The use of rugged commercial off-the-shelf (R-COTS) and consumer-grade COTS GNSS technologies also will play a part in overall GNSS market growth.

"COTS GNSS will benefit both industry players and military end users; while it gives the former a chance to implement solutions developed and verified in the civil sector in military projects. The latter as well gets access to mature and robust products at low prices," says Dominik Kimla, aerospace and defense industry analyst at Frost & Sullivan.

Related: Low-cost precision strike capability tested on drones

One factor getting in the way of GNSS growth, however, is increasing use of non-satellite-based navigation systems that can function without interference in dense urban areas and deep canyons, analysts say. Another factor working against GNSS growth involves past incidents of cyber-attacks on military GNSS data applications, despite encryption.

"Solution providers should focus on boosting the cyber security of military GNSS receivers and data applications," Kimla says. "They should also consider integrating military GNSS with alternative and non-satellite-based navigation systems to enhance their product offerings."

For more information contact the Frost & Sullivan aerospace and defense segment online at www.frost.com.

More in Trusted Computing