AeroMech Fury 1500 runway-independent, long-endurance UAV gets ready for duty after first flight

SAN LUIS OBISPO, Calif., 5 Jan. 2011. Unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) designers at AeroMech Engineering Inc. in San Luis Obispo, Calif., have flown the company's Fury 1500 small tactical unmanned aerial system (STUAS) for the first time. The Fury is a long-endurance, survivable, and runway-independent UAV able to carry a large payload.

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SAN LUIS OBISPO, Calif., 5 Jan. 2011.Unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) designers at AeroMech Engineering Inc. in San Luis Obispo, Calif., have flown the company's Fury 1500 small tactical unmanned aerial system (STUAS) for the first time. The Fury is a long-endurance, survivable, and runway-independent UAV able to carry a large payload.

Supporting Fury 1500 development are officials of the U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio. The unmanned aircraft is designed for long-endurance missions, and can carry several payloads simultaneously.

The Fury 1500 maiden flight was on 30 Nov. at Hunter Liggett Airfield at Fort Hunter Liggett on the Central California coast. This version of the Fury flew for 1 1/2 hours, controlled AeroMech’s SharkFin UAV mission-management software. The company's Fury 1200, built for special missions, first flew in 2008.

"Fury 1500 capitalize on both our aircraft production capabilities and our advanced ISR [intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance] mission management software Sharkfin,” says Robert Miller, AeroMech’s chief technology officer and development lead on the Fury 1500. For more information contact AeroMech online at www.aeromechengineering.com.

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