Pentagon asks industry for ideas on defeating enemy UAVs carrying chemical and biological weapons

FALLS CHURCH, Va., 7 Nov. 2014. U.S. military researchers are asking industry for ideas on how to use small unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) to detect chemical and biological warfare agents, as well as how to counter enemy small UAVs carrying chemical and biological weapons payloads.

Nov 7th, 2014
Pentagon asks industry for ideas on defeating enemy UAVs carrying chemical and biological weapons
Pentagon asks industry for ideas on defeating enemy UAVs carrying chemical and biological weapons
FALLS CHURCH, Va., 7 Nov. 2014. U.S. military researchers are asking industry for ideas on how to use small unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) to detect chemical and biological warfare agents, as well as how to counter enemy small UAVs carrying chemical and biological weapons payloads.

Officials of the U.S. Office of the Secretary of Defense (OSD) Rapid Reaction Technology Office in Falls Church, Va., have released a request for information (RRTO-2014-11-26-RFI-Spiral-15) for the Thunderstorm Technology Demonstration.

This initiative has two thrusts: demonstrating chemical and biological agent detection from UAVs; and countering commercially available UAVs carrying chemical and biological weapons payloads.

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The first focus area explores the potential of using a battery-powered vertical take-off and land (VTOL) UAV to detect and identify chemical and biological weapons of mass destruction (WMD).

Capabilities of interest include a backpackable system deployed from humvee-sized vehicles; UAV payloads that remotely detect chemical and biological agents, and transmit data about these agents to users more than one kilometer away; ease of use; and ground stations with visual displays of the sensing data received from the mobile detection systems; autonomous operations; ability to operate as high as 1,000 feet above the ground; and UAVs that have modular payloads.

Chemical and biological payloads should be able to detect standard G, H and V series chemical vapors and liquids; precursors or degradation chemical and biological agents; and persistent and natural flora. Payloads also should be able to collect samples for identification.

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The second focus area will explore ways to counter a small, low-cost commercial off-the-shelf UAV carrying a chemical or biological weapon. Capabilities of interest rapid detection and identification of hostile chemical- and biological-carrying UAVs; electronic systems that can prevent hostile use of these kinds of UAVs; and ways to intercept and neutralize these kinds of UAVs.

OSD researchers particularly are interested in kinetic and non-kinetic counter-UAV technologies that can be used inside and outside of the continental U.S.

Technology demonstrations are for the Thunderstorm Technology Demonstration spiral 15-3, which will be in spring 2015 at Camp Shelby outside of Hattiesburg, Miss. Thunderstorm provides an opportunity for technology developers to demonstrate new and evolving technological capabilities.

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Companies and colleges interested in submitting applications to participate in the Thunderstorm technology demonstration should email four-page capability white papers no later than 26 Nov. 2014 to thunderstorm@arl.psu.edu. Email questions and concerns to the same address.

More information is online at https://www.fbo.gov/spg/ODA/OSD/RRTO/RRTO-2014-11-26-RFI-Spiral-15/listing.html.

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