Unmanned aerial vehicles to do demonstration flights indoors this week at Farnborough air show

FARNBOROUGH, England, 19 July 2010. Manufacturers of unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) technology will be able to fly their unmanned aircraft -- indoors -- at a special pavilion this year at the Farnborough International Airshow, which opens today and extends through Friday in Farnborough, England. An indoor obstacle course has been designed to demonstrate the maneuverability and agility of different UAV models. The indoor flying area for unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) is a first-ever feature in the United Kingdom, and is at stand D19, hall 3 at Farnborough. This event, which alternates every other year with the Paris Air Show, is among the largest air shows in the world.

FARNBOROUGH, England, 19 July 2010. Manufacturers of unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) technology will be able to fly their unmanned aircraft -- indoors -- at a special pavilion this year at the Farnborough International Airshow, which opens today and extends through Friday in Farnborough, England.

An indoor obstacle course has been designed to demonstrate the maneuverability and agility of different UAV models. The indoor flying area for unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) is a first-ever feature in the United Kingdom, and is at stand D19, hall 3 at Farnborough. This event, which alternates every other year with the Paris Air Show, is among the largest air shows in the world.

This area reflects the emerging UAV market which is estimated to be worth $30.6 billion between now and 2020. A UAV flight schedule lined up this week at the indoor flight display will enable visitors to see unmanned aircraft take to the air, including those from Aurora Flight Sciences in Manassas, Va.; and Air 2 Air Ltd. in Uxbridge, England. Flying displays will be throughout the day from today through Friday 23 July.

"Flying UAS really animates the whole sector and brings it alive," says Amanda Stainer, director of exhibitions and events at Farnborough International Ltd. (FIL), the company in charge of the Farnborough International Airshow. "Building an obstacle course has been a lot of fun but it has a serious side too in that it allows people to see for themselves exactly what UAS can do."

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