Coda Octopus completes successful Echoscope trials with NATO in Europe

NEW YORK, 26 Aug 2005. Coda Octopus Group, Inc., has reported the completion of another series of successful trials of its new real-time 3D sonar system, the Coda Echoscope. In conjunction with NATO's Underwater Research Center (NURC) and QinetiQ in Dorset, England, the trials took place in La Spezia, Italy.

NEW YORK, 26 Aug 2005. Coda Octopus Group, Inc., has reported the completion of another series of successful trials of its new real-time 3D sonar system, the Coda Echoscope. In conjunction with NATO's Underwater Research Center (NURC) and QinetiQ in Dorset, England, the trials took place in La Spezia, Italy.

Deployed as part of an integrated system for harbor protection, Coda Echoscope works in conjunction with long-range diver detection systems such as QinetiQ's 'Cerberus' system to provide real-time, high-resolution visualization of potential threats such as a diver entering a port or harbor. While used successfully by NURC in a fixed position, providing short-range data for comparison with Cerberus, Echoscope is also suited as part of a rapid reconnaissance system to investigate and verify potential treats detected by the longer-range system. It is also small enough to be mounted on fast RIBs (rigid inflatable boats) such as those used by the U.S. Coast Guard.

"In addition to intruder-detection applications, Echoscope is also ideal for high speed underwater surveys of port and harbor walls and structures including under-hull surveys, and checking for objects such as explosives, mines, or contraband," says Jason Reid, chief executive officer of Coda Octopus.

Reid says that in recent extensive trials undertaken on behalf of the Coast Guard, the Coda Echoscope was able to perform a complete harbor scan resulting in full real-time 3D visualizations of harbor walls and ship hulls in a matter of minutes and, when mounted in a fixed location at the entrance to a harbor, the Echoscope can provide instantaneous, covert 3D images of all incoming vessels.

"The capabilities of the Echoscope are unique," Reid says, "and we believe it will increasingly be recognized as the sonar of the future and a necessity in helping to secure ports and harbors throughout the world against terrorist threats."

For more information visit www.codaoctopus.com.

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