Air Force Research Lab information directorate names chief scientist

ROME, N.Y., 7 Sept. 2005. Leaders of the U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory's Information Directorate in Rome, N.Y., are naming Dr. Richard W. Linderman as acting chief scientist.

Sep 7th, 2005

ROME, N.Y., 7 Sept. 2005. Leaders of the U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory's Information Directorate in Rome, N.Y., are naming Dr. Richard W. Linderman as acting chief scientist.

Linderman previously served the directorate as senior scientist for advanced computing architectures. He replaces Dr. Northrup Fowler III, who retired Sept. 2 after a 27-year career in Air Force research and development.

The directorate is the Air Force center for the advancement and application of information systems science and technology for aerospace command and control and its transition to air, space, and ground systems.

It consists of more than 800 military and civilian scientists, engineers, and administrative and support people, pursuing research and development projects with an annual budget of more than $550 million.

The directorate investigates information fusion and exploitation, command and control, advanced architectures, information management, communications and networking, collaborative environments, modeling and simulation, defensive information warfare, and intelligent information systems technologies.

Linderman was commissioned by the Air Force as a second lieutenant in May 1980. Upon completing four years of graduate studies, he entered active duty, teaching graduate computer architecture courses and leading related research at the Air Force Institute of Technology where he rose to the rank of associate professor.

In 1988, he was assigned to the former Air Force Rome Air Development Center in Rome, N.Y., to lead surveillance signal processing architecture activities. In 1991, he switched from active duty to Air Force civil service as a senior electronics engineer at Rome Laboratory, becoming a principal engineer in 1997.

During these years, he pioneered three dimensional packaging of embedded architectures and led the Department of Defense community exploring signal/image processing applications of high performance computers. In 1997, with the standup of the Air Force Research Laboratory, he served as technical advisor, advanced computing architectures. He became Special Assistant to the Chief Scientist in 2000 and held that position until being appointed a senior scientist in 2004.

Linderman earned a bachelor of science, master's, and doctorate in electrical engineering from Cornell University. He holds six U.S. patents and has published over 60 journal, conference and technical papers. He is a fellow of both the AFRL and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE).

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