Lockheed Martin develops airborne lab to test C4ISR capabilities

PARIS, 16 June 2009. Lockheed Martin developed an Airborne Multi-INT Laboratory (AML), to be used for operational testing and experimentation of C4ISR capabilities. The AML provides a platform for advanced research and realistic testing and demonstration of emerging intelligence, communications, networking, and sensors capabilities that can improve strategic and tactical responsiveness for military, strategic, and homeland security forces.

Jun 16th, 2009

PARIS, 16 June 2009. Lockheed Martin developed an Airborne Multi-INT Laboratory (AML), to be used for operational testing and experimentation of C4ISR capabilities. The AML provides a platform for advanced research and realistic testing and demonstration of emerging intelligence, communications, networking, and sensors capabilities that can improve strategic and tactical responsiveness for military, strategic, and homeland security forces.

"The AML will be a key asset in furthering our ability to develop, test, and field rapidly deployable capabilities that warfighters need in the field," says John Mengucci, president of Lockheed Martin's IS&GS-Defense. "It is important to note this is not about proving the value of multi-INT or mobile communications -- that is the state of the practice. This is about expediting our ability to provide intelligence across the full spectrum of conflict."

The AML, a Gulfstream III business jet, provides a reconfigurable platform for a wide variety of multi-INT experiments and sensor evaluation, as well as participation in government and coalition exercises. Using the AML as a multi-role cooperative research platform testbed, the team will work with operational commands to develop innovative ways to bring ISR to the edge; investigate new Reconnaissance, Surveillance, and Target Acquisition (RSTA) approaches; and develop operational concepts that link battlefield resources at all echelons, reveals a representative.

Planned experimentation exercises include improvement of the end- to-end intelligence enterprise from initial intercept through sensor cross queuing, precision geo-location, and rapid transmission to the end user.

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