Vetronics and vehicle power upgrades to be part of major redesign of Stryker armored vehicle

STERLING HEIGHTS, Mich., 5 Dec. 2009. Armored vehicle designers at General Dynamics Land Systems (GDLS) in Sterling Heights, Mich., are designing next-generation digital vetronics and vehicle power systems as part of a $203 million U.S. Army contract to re-design a next-generation Stryker combat vehicle.

Posted by John Keller

STERLING HEIGHTS, Mich., 5 Dec. 2009.Armored vehicle designers at General Dynamics Land Systems (GDLS) in Sterling Heights, Mich., are designing next-generation digital vetronics and vehicle power systems as part of a $203 million U.S. Army contract to re-design a next-generation Stryker combat vehicle.

The digital architecture of the next-generation Stryker tactical vehicle will connect new command, control, communications, computers, intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (C4ISR) technologies to give Stryker crews and surrounding infantry soldiers access to the latest situational-awareness and mission systems technology, General Dynamics officials say.

Company engineers will build a larger, faster Stryker demonstrator vehicle to assess new technologies such as a 450 horsepower diesel engine, upgraded suspension and driveline to carry a 60,000-pound payload, larger tires, and new braking system for enhance Stryker protection, power, mobility and firepower.

"Strykers have performed exceptionally well for the U.S. Army over more than 25 million miles of combat experience," says Mike Cannon, senior vice president of ground combat systems at General Dynamics Land Systems.

"This contract reflects the Army's desire to build on that strong performance by incorporating the latest crew-protection technologies, as well as more power, mobility, agility and information connectivity, into a platform that will continue to be a critical part of the Army's force structure through the foreseeable future," Cannon says.

Stryker is a family of eight-wheel combat vehicles able to travel as fast as 60 miles per hour on highways, has a range of 312 miles, and standard armament of .50-cal. machine gun or a MK19 grenade launcher, operated from inside the vehicle with advanced video sighting.

The Stryker has two basic versions -- infantry carrier vehicle, and mobile gun system. The infantry carrier vehicle transports a nine-man infantry squad plus two-person crew. The mobile gun system has a 105 millimeter cannon. Stryker also can be outfitted for reconnaissance, mortar carrier, fire-support, engineer squad, medical evacuation, anti-tank missile, and nuclear/biological/chemical reconnaissance.

The Army has seven Stryker Brigade Combat Teams, three of which are deployed in combat zones: two in Iraq and one in Afghanistan. To date, General Dynamics has delivered nearly 3,000 vehicles and trained more than 19,000 soldiers in their use.

For more information contact General Dynamics Land Systems online at www.gdls.com.

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