Satellite navigation turns artillery shells into precision-strike weapons: the Mil & Aero video blog

VIDEO BLOG, 19 April 2011. Everyone knows the Army's heavy artillery is a brute-force weapon, but how many think of artillery as a precision-strike weapon? The M982 Excalibur round for 155-millimeter artillery uses GPS guidance and control surfaces to attack enemies from above -- even at close range. John Keller reports in this week's Mil & Aero video blog.

VIDEO BLOG, 19 April 2011. Everyone knows the Army's heavy artillery is a brute-force weapon, but how many think of artillery as a precision-strike weapon? The M982 Excalibur round for 155-millimeter artillery uses GPS guidance and control surfaces to attack enemies from above -- even at close range. John Keller reports in this week's Mil & Aero video blog.

Please see also:

-- Satellite-guided heavy artillery shell able to detect and attack moving targets to be produced by Raytheon;

-- Laser-based firing to improve reliability, affordability, and safety in Army artillery systems;

-- Textron to provide armored vehicle with artillery directing electro-optical payload;

-- IEC lends precision guidance to artillery shells with satellite navigation;

-- Vetronics upgrade for M109A6-PIM self-propelled field artillery uses rugged displays from RGB Spectrum;

-- Radstone to provide embedded computers for artillery fire-control system;

-- Army needs radar fire control to help defend against rockets, artillery, and mortar rounds; and

-- High-frequency radio technology from Harris selected by Army for High Mobility Artillery Rocket System.

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