NASA chooses Spectrum Signal and Green Hills for space radio communications technology

ORLANDO, Fla., 17 Nov. 2006. Scientists from the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) needed software technology to help support future advanced space and ground-based communications operations. They found their solution from Green Hills Software in Santa Barbara, Calif.

Nov 17th, 2006

ORLANDO, Fla., 17 Nov. 2006. Scientists from the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) needed software technology to help support future advanced space and ground-based communications operations. They found their solution from Green Hills Software in Santa Barbara, Calif.

The NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland chose the Green Hills Platform for Software Defined Radio (SDR) to provide capabilities necessary for rapid design, development and refinement of its next-generation Space Telecommunications System Architecture (STRS). Green Hills made the announcement this week at the SDR Forum 2006 conference in Orlando, Fla.

Also part of NASA's advanced communications solution is the flexCommTM SDR-4000 reconfigurable, multi-function communications platform from Spectrum Signal Processing in Burnaby, British Columbia.

The Green Hills SDR Platform for NASA includes the ultra-secure and reliable Integrity real-time operating system (RTOS); dual-mode IPv4 networking stack support; and waveform design and development tools to help users move from concept to deployment as quickly as possible.

"The Integrity-based SDR-4000 delivers a complete, integrated SDR hardware and software solution that is optimized for rapid prototyping and deployment," says Michael Farley, president of Spectrum Signal. "NASA selected this platform because of its ability to aid the availability of its advanced, scalable, reconfigurable and upgradeable future STRS radio architecture."

The use of SDR and STRS technology provides NASA with the capability to support advanced space and ground-based communications operations while reducing the cost of future missions by reducing and consolidating old radio equipment.

NASA is developing and refining the Space Telecommunications Radio System, with demonstrations planned in 2007. For more information contact Green Hills online at www.ghs.com.

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