LaBarge to provide printed circuit cards for Raytheon's Rolling Airframe Missile system

ST. LOUIS, 8 July 2010. Engineers at Raytheon Missile Systems in Tucson, Ariz., needed printed circuit card assemblies for the RIM-116 Rolling Airframe Missile (RAM) surface-to-air missile for naval surface warships. They found their solution from LaBarge Inc. in St. Louis. RAM is a small, lightweight, infrared-guided anti-air missile used by navies in the U.S., Turkey, Germany, Greece, Saudi Araba, Egypt, and South Korea.

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ST. LOUIS, 8 July 2010. Engineers at Raytheon Missile Systems in Tucson, Ariz., needed printed circuit card assemblies for the RIM-116 Rolling Airframe Missile (RAM) surface-to-air missile for naval surface warships. They found their solution from LaBarge Inc. in St. Louis.

Raytheon (NYSE: RTN) is awarding a $1.2 million contract to LaBarge (NYSE Amex: LB) to provide board products for the RAM system. LaBarge also is providing wiring harnesses for the Rolling Airframe Missile system. RAM is a small, lightweight, infrared-guided missile used by navies in the U.S., Turkey, Germany, Greece, Saudi Araba, Egypt, and South Korea.

The RAM's onboard Mk-49 launcher stores 21 missiles. On U.S. Navy ships it is integrated with the AN/SWY-2 and ship self defense system combat systems. LaBarge will do the work at its Tulsa, Okla., facility, and should be finished by next year.

"LaBarge has produced a variety of complex wiring harnesses for the RAM missile system for two decades. This contract expands LaBarge's support of Raytheon's missile system to include electronic assemblies," says Craig LaBarge, chief executive officer and president.

For more information contact LaBarge online at www.labarge.com.

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