NATO militaries to increase their use of electro-optics on combat vehicles through 2015, Frost & Sullivan says

LONDON, 20 Sept. 2011. Demand for electro-optical technology for military land vehicles in NATO countries should be $30.77 billion from 2010 through 2016, predict analysts at Frost & Sullivan, a market research firm in London. Driving the vehicular electro-optics market will be an expected increase in military land vehicle procurements and upgrades in Australia, France, Germany, the United Kingdom, and the United States, triggered by NATO-led military operations in Afghanistan, Frost & Sullivan analysts say in a report entitled Land-Based Optronics Market.

Sep 20th, 2011
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LONDON, 20 Sept. 2011. Demand for electro-optical technology for military combat vehicles in NATO countries should be $30.77 billion from 2010 through 2016, predict analysts at Frost & Sullivan, a market research firm in London. Driving the vehicular electro-optics market will be an expected increase in military land vehicle procurements and upgrades in Australia, France, Germany, the United Kingdom, and the United States, triggered by NATO-led military operations in Afghanistan, Frost & Sullivan analysts say in a report entitled Land-Based Optronics Market.NATO militaries will acquire electro-optical devices for vetronics applications in the thousands, depending on the needs of local governments, Frost & Sullivan analysts say. The report also considers major modernization programs in India and parts of Europe.Land-based electro-optics solutions will take precedence over air- and naval-based electro-optics solutions through the middle of this decade because of existing operations in Afghanistan, analysts say. Demand also will increase for navigation and surveillance equipment for military vehicles manufactured in India, Brazil, Russia, South Korea, and others, Frost & Sullivan says. Dealing with power issues will emerge as a key challenge for suppliers in this market.

European militaries will use image intensification binoculars and monoculars for surveillance. Investments in thermal imaging technology have not been significant. In the next five to eight years, parts of Europe, Asia, and the Middle East should increase their use of electro-optics on military land vehicles, Frost & Sullivan analysts say.

For more information contact Frost & Sullivan online at www.frost.com.

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