Range finding laser from BAE Systems to U.S. Army infantry soldiers with laser targeting

NASHUA, N.H., 13 Aug. 2009. BAE Systems in Nashua, N.H., is providing U.S. Army soldiers with handheld range finding laser systems to help with laser targeting while on foot, in daylight or at night, and in obscured-visibility conditions such as fog and smoke.

NASHUA, N.H., 13 Aug. 2009. BAE Systems in Nashua, N.H., is providing U.S. Army soldiers with handheld range finding laser systems to help with laser targeting while on foot, in daylight or at night, and in obscured-visibility conditions such as fog and smoke.


BAE Systems video

The laser targeting system, called the laser target locator, "will enable soldiers to determine target coordinates quickly, safely, and accurately," says Dan Murray, the BAE Systems director of the laser target locator modules (LTLM) program.

The LTLM military laser range finder and targeting system enables soldiers to identify target locations. Weighing less than 5.5 pounds, the LTLM consists of a direct-view optic system, a military night vision camera derived from the thermal cameras used in BAE Systems' advanced thermal weapon sights, a laser range finder, a digital compass, and a GPS sensor.

The system will allow users to recognize targets more than 4.2 kilometers away in daylight and 900 meters in total darkness. Deliveries are scheduled to begin this year. For more information contact BAE Systems online at www.baesystems.com.

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