Flight simulator network for distributed training of C-17 cargo jet pilots to open at Scott AFB

ST. LOUIS, 1 Sept. 2009. U.S. Air Force C-17 cargo jet pilots will be able to train on an interactive flight simulator network that engineers at the Boeing Co. in St. Louis are set to build at Scott Air Force Base, Ill. Boeing will create a simulator network of 10 existing C-17 flight simulators in the United States, using Scott Air Force Base as the hub.

Sep 1st, 2009

ST. LOUIS, 1 Sept. 2009. U.S. Air Force C-17 cargo jet pilots will be able to train on an interactive flight simulator network that engineers at the Boeing Co. in St. Louis are set to build at Scott Air Force Base, Ill. Boeing will create a simulator network of 10 existing C-17 flight simulators in the United States, using Scott Air Force Base as the hub.

Boeing Co. won an Air Force flight simulation contract this week to deliver a C-17 Distributed Training Center (DTC) at Scott Air Force Base in January 2012. The 10 military simulation training sites on the simulation network will maintain their existing simulation training connections to the Distributed Mission Operations (DMO) computer simulation network, which enables military aircraft simulation and training sites around the world to link with one another for large-scale, high-fidelity training operations.

"This capability will allow the Air Force's Air Mobility Command (AMC) to conduct continuation and mission qualification training, execute mission rehearsal operations, develop tactics, and participate in large force exercises in a realistic environment at a fraction of live-fly costs and with little risk," says Sean Carey, AMC program manager for DMO.

The C-17 established its networking capability in 2004, allowing C-17 crews to participate in "Virtual Flag" exercises with several aircraft platforms for the first time. In order to support the large amount of bandwidth required as additional C-17 training sites were added, Boeing began upgrading the associated hardware and software in 2007.

The C-17-specific DTC will extend current C-17 DMO capabilities, allowing for higher-fidelity aircrew training; it also will provide the airlift community with a continuously available training network capability.

"Expanding the AMC's DMO capability allows for interoperability between simulators within AMC, as well as between AMC and other Air Force major commands, and joint and coalition partners," says Mark McGraw, Boeing vice president, Training Systems and Services. "Mission-ready C-17 aircrews are essential to global security. This program ensures that they will receive the most realistic, training available."

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-- Posted by John Keller, jkeller@pennwell.com. www.milaero.com.

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