ASIC North enters analog IP market

SOUTH BURLINGTON, Vermont, 3 Oct. 2009. ASIC North Inc., a VLSI design service company, has entered the analog intellectual property (IP) market. In a move to enhance its analog/mixed-signal (A/MS) design services, ASIC North offers IP for high-performance, low-power analog-to-digital converters (ADC). The hardened analog cores target the 180nm high-voltage technology being co-developed by IBM Microelectronics and austriamicrosystems.

Oct 3rd, 2009

SOUTH BURLINGTON, Vermont, 3 Oct. 2009. ASIC North Inc., a VLSI design service company, has entered the analog intellectual property (IP) market. In a move to enhance its analog/mixed-signal (A/MS) design services, ASIC North offers IP for high-performance, low-power analog-to-digital converters (ADC). The hardened analog cores target the 180nm high-voltage technology being co-developed by IBM Microelectronics and austriamicrosystems.

ASIC North's ADC cores support the next-generation A/MS design implementations in the high-voltage, 180nm silicon technology.

The AN12512P is a 12-bit, 125Ms/s pipeline data converter. It has the ability to scale power consumption by reducing precision or sampling frequency. At this performance point, the AN12512P is well suited for some of today's fastest growing markets: GPS communications and medical instrumentation.

The AN210S is a 10-bit 2MS/s SAR architecture data converter. Providing better performance than most commercially available IP for its area and power consumption, the AN210S is ideally suited for a number of general purpose applications in a mixed-signal system.

"As the analog/mixed signal market continues to grow at the 180nm technology node, we felt it was important to enable next generation mixed-signal designs with the IP necessary," says ASIC North president, Michael Slattery. "Applications based upon high-voltage technologies are just beginning to proliferate in the market. Data converters are important IP components of these new systems. The analog cores announced today represent the beginnings of a new IP ecosystem.

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