Army chooses SAIC and L-3 for missile defense modeling and simulation in contracts worth potential $641.9 million

HUNTSVILLE, Ala., 3 Aug. 2010. Leaders of the U.S. Army Space and Missile Defense Command in Huntsville, Ala., are awarding two contracts with a combined potential value of $641.9 million to develop critical technologies for modeling and simulation of space and missile defense systems. Receiving the contracts are Science Applications International Corp. (SAIC) in San Diego, and L-3 Communications Government Services segment in Chantilly, Va. SAIC will receive a maximum of $343.7 million, and L-3 will receive as much as $298.2 million. The contracts were announced Monday.

Aug 3rd, 2010
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HUNTSVILLE, Ala., 3 Aug. 2010. Leaders of the U.S. Army Space and Missile Defense Command in Huntsville, Ala., are awarding two contracts with a combined potential value of $641.9 million to develop critical technologies for modeling and simulation of space and missile defense systems.

Receiving the contracts are Science Applications International Corp. (SAIC) in San Diego, and L-3 Communications Government Services segment in Chantilly, Va. SAIC will receive a maximum of $343.7 million, and L-3 will receive as much as $298.2 million. The contracts were announced Monday.

These contracts involve the Army's Warfighter Modeling, Simulation, Analysis, and Integration Support (WMSA&IS) program to provide the Army and U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) with an advanced capability for modeling, simulation, analysis, and integration of space and missile defense issues and technologies.

SAIC and L-3 will compete for Army task orders as they arise in this program as Army experts identify specific requirements. The contractors will develop critical technologies to model and simulate missile defense process-target sensing, intelligence, and sensor information and database fusion, command and control, target execution, and damage assessment.

There is a three-year basic period of performance, and two 2-year optional periods of performance. The WMSA&IS efforts will use tools based on traditional simulation and statistical modeling while incorporating the insight of man-in-the-loop simulation. The WMSA&IS efforts will combine geographically dispersed existing and future simulation components and architectures.

For more information contact the Army Space and Missile Defense Command online at /www.smdc.army.mil, SAIC at www.saic.com, or L-3 Government Services at www.l-3com.com.

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