Raytheon to develop SWIR imaging camera for next-generation photonics mast on Navy attack submarines

ARLINGTON, Va., 22 April 2010. Electro-optical engineers at Raytheon Vision Systems in Goleta, Calif., are developing advanced short wave infrared (SWIR) imaging camera technology for the next-generation photonics mast on U.S. Navy Virginia-class fast attack submarines under terms of a $7.4 million contract announced Tuesday.

Apr 22nd, 2010

Posted by John Keller

ARLINGTON, Va., 22 April 2010.Electro-optical engineers at Raytheon Vision Systems in Goleta, Calif., are developing advanced short wave infrared (SWIR) imaging camera technology for the next-generation photonics mast on U.S. Navy Virginia-class fast attack submarines under terms of a $7.4 million contract announced Tuesday.

Raytheon is doing the SWIR camera work as part of the Affordable Modular Panoramic Photonics Mast program. Navy researchers say they expect Raytheon to enhance the current state of art in SWIR imaging by providing higher resolution, area coverage, and sensitivity than is available today.

Awarding the contract are officials of the Office of Naval Research (ONR) in Arlington, Va.

The Affordable Modular Panoramic Photonics Mast program seeks to eliminate the need for mast rotational assemblies and related components, achieve 360-degree "quick look" search time that is five times faster than is available today, and develop SWIR imaging capability under degraded and restricted conditions, Navy researchers say.

For the next-generation submarine photonics mast, Raytheon will develop a low-light-level SWIR still-image and video camera for daytime haze penetration, camouflaged target detection, and nighttime imaging.

ONR officials want to give the Affordable Modular Panoramic Photonics Mast the capability to detect paint-related features at night that are discernible in visible imagery. The SWIR imaging camera that Raytheon is developing will operate in the 1-to-1.7-micron band.

Raytheon experts will develop camera hardware no larger than 2.5 by 2.5 by 5 inches to fit the mast, with pixel size smaller than 10 microns in a 1,900-by-1,200-pixel format. The SWIR camera will operate in rolling or snapshot modes, take video at speeds of at least 30 frames per second, and have power consumption of less than 20 Watts.

Another goal of the program is to enhance the current state of the art in short wave infrared imaging resolution, area coverage, and sensitivity. For more information contact Raytheon Vision Systems online at www.raytheon.com, or the Office of Naval Research at www.onr.navy.mil.

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