Navy weapons researchers ask for industry’s ideas in advanced MMIC ASICs and circuit boards

U.S. Navy weapons researchers are asking for industry’s help in designing complex monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) application-specific integrated circuits (ASICs) and printed circuit boards for advanced RF and microwave applications like radar, munitions guidance, and electronic warfare (EW).

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RIDGECREST, Calif. — U.S. Navy weapons researchers are asking for industry’s help in designing complex monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) application-specific integrated circuits (ASICs) and printed circuit boards for advanced RF and microwave applications like radar, munitions guidance, and electronic warfare (EW).

Navy weapons researchers are looking for new complex MMIC ASICs and printed circuit boards for radar, munitions guidance, and electronic warfare.

Officials of the Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Division (NAWCWD) at China Lake Naval Weapons Station in Ridgecrest, Calif., have issued a sources-sought notice (N6893618R0050) for the Advancements in Integrated Circuit Technology Areas project.

Navy researchers are asking industry for white papers on MMIC ASIC integrated circuit signal integrity, packaging, and related topics.

White paper submissions should address advancements in IC technology areas like ASIC and MMIC design, physical layout, modeling, characterization, fabrication processes, and materials.

Navy researchers would like white papers that address:

  • packaging and assembly techniques at the IC and system level;
  • printed circuit board design, physical layout, and modeling of prototype design methodology, including circuit boards of 20 layers or more, wiring dimensions of 76 microns or smaller, and boards with micro-via and via-in-via interconnects;
  • packaging design technologies such as circuit board construction materials, performance-enhancing layout techniques, and cooling systems;
  • signal integrity, power integrity, and thermal integrity analysis techniques at the IC, circuit board, and system level;
  • AC and DC power delivery network capabilities including frequency-based impedance at the IC and circuit board level;
  • system-level architecture and design at various levels of complexity and integration;
  • system level modeling for performance predictions; and
  • non-disclosure agreements.

Companies interested should e-mail questions, concerns, and white papers to the Navy’s Janet Campbell at janet.campbell@navy.mil with a copy to Sierra Trepanier at sierra.trepanier@navy.mil.

More information is online at https://www.fbo.gov/notices/fba7f075ad99964695ffbdf15beae463.

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