Lockheed Martin builds new displays for surface warships

U.S. Navy shipboard electronics experts needed enterprise displays for Navy surface warships. They found their solution at the Lockheed Martin Corp. Mission Systems and Training segment in Manassas, Va.

Jun 1st, 2016
1606mae Pa Zumwalt

U.S. Navy shipboard electronics experts needed enterprise displays for Navy surface warships. They found their solution at the Lockheed Martin Corp. Mission Systems and Training segment in Manassas, Va.

Officials of the Naval Sea Systems Command in Washington announced an $8.1 million contract to Lockheed Martin for the Technology Insertion 16 production portion of the Common Display System (CDS) program. The CDS is a family of enterprise display systems for Navy surface warships, and has the potential for use with the U.S. Marine Corps, as well as with allied navies.

With this contract, Lockheed Martin effectively takes over from DRS Technologies Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Finmeccanica S.p.A., as the lead systems integrator for the latest versions of the Navy Common Display System.

A $15.5 million contract for the Technology Insertion 12 portion of the CDS program went to the DRS Laurel Technologies segment of DRS Technologies in Johnstown, Pa., one year ago. Lockheed Martin was a key partner to DRS on that and on previous CDS technology insertion contracts.

Other companies that historically have taken part in the Navy CDS program include General Dynamics Mission Systems in Fairfax, Va.; Barco in Duluth, Ga.; and Aydin Displays Inc., a Sparton company in Birdsboro, Pa.

Successive technology insertions represent a procurement approach designed to equip Navy vessels, aircraft, and shore installations with the latest technologies at the most reasonable costs. Technology insertions normally involve mature technologies available largely as commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) items.

Navy experts initially developed the CDS for the DDG 1000 Zumwalt-class, surface-attack destroyer, as well as for Aegis modernization efforts aboard the Navy's Ticonderoga-class cruisers and Arleigh Burke-class destroyers.

Navy electronics experts have expanded the requirement for CDS to Navy aircraft carriers, amphibious assault ships, and dock landing ships. Navy leaders also are considering the CDS for Navy aircraft and submarines.

Navy leaders scrapped plans to build 32 Zumwalt-class destroyers, and are likely to build only two of the large vessels, which are built around the Advanced Gun System (AGS), a 155-millimeter cannon designed to hurl special shells as far as 83 nautical miles at a rate of 10 rounds per minute, and are designed primarily for shore bombardment.

FOR MORE INFORMATION visit Lockheed Martin Mission Systems and Training online at www.lockheedmartin.com/us/mst, and Naval Sea Systems Command at www.navsea.navy.mil.

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