Things are looking up for avionics and air traffic control in 2012 U.S. budget, but not so good for NASA

Video blog, 16 March 2011. The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) in Washington seems to have its priorities straight in plans for next year to improve air traffic control efficiencies, in the commercial airliner cockpit as well as on the ground. NASA's bare-bones budget, however, would leave the U.S. space program a customer for the Russian rocket industry, as John McHale reports.

The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) in Washington seems to have its priorities straight in plans for next year to improve air traffic control efficiencies, in the commercial airliner cockpit as well as on the ground. NASA's bare-bones budget, however, would leave the U.S. space program a customer for the Russian rocket industry, as John McHale reports.

See also:

-- NextGen funding exceeds $1.2 billion in FAA's 2012 budget request;

-- http://www.militaryaerospace.com/index/display/avi-article-display/8389889464/articles/avionics-intelligence/news/2011/2/nasa-budget_remains.html;

-- SESAR program is right on track;

-- FAA, European Union sign NextGen research agreement; and

-- FAA forecast predicts air travel to double in two decades.

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