Boeing and DDC demonstrate major speed advances in 1553 databus

ST. LOUIS, 5 Jan. 2006. Boeing Phantom Works in St. Louis and Data Device Corp. of Bohemia, N.Y., completed a flight demonstration Dec. 16 of DDC's HyPer-1553 technology on a Boeing F-15E Strike Eagle advanced technology demonstrator jet fighter aircraft.

ST. LOUIS, 5 Jan. 2006. Boeing Phantom Works in St. Louis and Data Device Corp. of Bohemia, N.Y., completed a flight demonstration Dec. 16 of DDC's HyPer-1553 technology on a Boeing F-15E Strike Eagle advanced technology demonstrator jet fighter aircraft.

HyPer-1553 technology uses existing MIL-STD-1553 bus infrastructure to move data at much higher rates than the 1 megabit per second rate conventional MIL-STD-1553 provides, DDC officials say.

This paves the way for avionics system upgrades in proven aircraft with much lower cost and significantly shorter aircraft down-time than would be required by other high data options that would require new wiring, according to DDC.

Since HyPer-1553 can operate in parallel with existing MIL-STD-1553 data traffic; upgrades can be done incrementally which also provides substantial cost savings.

"The demand for this capability has been growing for the past several years," says Todd Decker, DDC's marketing manager for 1553 products. "Applications such as network-centric operations and sensor fusion are starved for more data bandwidth between subsystems -- more than today's 1553 can supply."

DDC officials plan to couple the company's ACE series of MIL-STD-1553 products with HyPer-1553 technology, says Amir Massumi, director of marketing at DDC. The company's roadmap for HyPer-1553 technology includes plans for compatibility with the emerging MIL-STD-1553B Notice 5 requirements.

Boeing Phantom Works engineers used HyPer-1553 technology to transmit image data between a rugged 6U VME chassis mounted in the forward equipment bay of the F-15E aircraft and a modified Joint Direct Attack Munition (JDAM) mounted on a wing pylon station.

The flight demonstration included successful transmission of HyPer-1553 data at 40 megabits per second over existing 1553 infrastructure -- in parallel with conventional MIL-STD-1553 traffic; and at 80 and 120 megabits per second on a another 1553 bus dedicated to HyPer-1553 data.

Prior to the flight demonstration, Boeing ran tests to ensure that DDC's HyPer 1553 card coupled with a Honeywell General Purpose Processor (GPP) met all the environment requirements for the flight demonstration.

The testing included stressing the rugged mil-spec design for extreme temperature, altitude, shock and vibration as well as an ingress and egress electromagnetic interference tests.

"Our 25 year experience in developing products for MIL-STD-1553 applications definitely helped us to get a flyable design through Boeing's rigorous flight certification process." says Paul Knobloch, DDC's HyPer 1553 project engineer. Honeywell contributed to the flight demonstration project with technical support and computer hardware and software.

For more information contact DDC online at www.ddc-web.com.

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