Defense Commercial Vendors Coalition (DCVC) announces change to 2007 National Defense Authorization Act

WASHINGTON, 7 Dec. 2006. The Defense Commercial Vendors Coalition (DCVC) has announced that new legislative language for the Fiscal Year 2007 National Defense Authorization Act has been inserted into Section 805 of the legislation, marking the first major victory in the organization's one-year history.

WASHINGTON, 7 Dec. 2006. The Defense Commercial Vendors Coalition (DCVC) has announced that new legislative language for the Fiscal Year 2007 National Defense Authorization Act has been inserted into Section 805 of the legislation, marking the first major victory in the organization's one-year history.

The insertion, which amends the law, requires Major Defense Acquisition Programs (MDAP) to certify that "appropriate market research has been conducted prior to technology development to reduce duplication of existing technology and products."

The new language serves as a reinforcement and clarification of existing acquisition policies and regulations, such as the 1994 Federal Acquisition Streamlining Act (FASA), OMB-A119, OMB-A76, the Clinger-Cohen Act, DoD 5000, and the FAR Parts 10, 11, and 12.

The DCVC promotes federal acquisition reform in order to foster the development of a truly competitive marketplace. According to DCVC representatives, having a competitive marketplace will lead to greater value for the American taxpayer, increased innovation, and better technology and resources for the men and women in military service.

"The equivalent of the $400 hammer debacle is happening all over again in the DOD right now," says Ian Musselman, executive director of the DCVC. "Despite massive spending, budget overruns, and an aging workforce in the DOD's IT sector, little action has been taken to combat the problem of technology reinvention. This legislation is one small step to addressing the lack of comprehensive market research."

"Under the current acquisition award system and environment, the use of readily available, cost-effective products and technologies are disruptive to the economic interests of the prime contractor," says Dr. Sally Baron, an independent consultant whose primary focus is increasing applications of commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) tools in the government. "The DOD needs to better align contracting practices such that comprehensive market research clearly reveals which components of a program can be purchased off-the-shelf, which portions need to be a firm fixed price, and where a cost-plus-award-fee contract should be used for truly unique aspects of the program." Dr. Baron is a special advisor to the DCVC and received her Ph.D. from Stanford University where she worked with former Defense Secretary William Perry.

The DCVC provides its members with confidential advocacy for better procurement regulations, policies, and enforcement.

More in Home