Joint Common Missile electronics development moves ahead

ORLANDO, Fla., June 21, 2005. The tri-mode seeker and guidance software on the Lockheed Martin Joint Common Missile (JCM) have passed separate subsystem preliminary design reviews, clearing the way for a systemwide review later this month, company officials announced today.

ORLANDO, Fla., June 21, 2005. The tri-mode seeker and guidance software on the Lockheed Martin Joint Common Missile (JCM) have passed separate subsystem preliminary design reviews, clearing the way for a systemwide review later this month, company officials announced today.

Reviews of the JCM seeker hardware and software were at the Lockheed Martin Missiles and Fire Control facility in Orlando in late May and early June. These reviews will help determine if the program is mature enough to move ahead to the next phase of system design and development.

"The tri-mode seeker is really what distinguishes JCM from the eight missiles it will be replacing," says Rick Edwards, director for tactical missiles at Lockheed Martin Missiles and Fire Control. "The tri-mode seeker and multi-purpose warhead were identified as crucial risk areas for the JCM program because of their advanced technologies."

JCM's multi-purpose warhead includes a tandem-shaped charge for armored targets and a blast fragmentation capability for other targets, such as reinforced structures.

The JCM seeker includes a semi-active laser for precision strike and limited collateral damage; an imaging-infrared (I2R) sensor for passive fire-and-forget amid countermeasures; and a millimeter-wave (MMW) radar, for active fire-and-forget and operation in adverse weather and battlefield obscurants.

The most recent subsystem review the JCM's seeker and the micro-miniaturized high-speed electronics that process the data the sensors acquire. The software and simulations review covered onboard computer software that interprets the seeker data, selects a target, sets the warhead mode, and guides the missile to its target.

"We've tracked a T-72 tank, amphibious landing craft, and a fast-moving maneuvering Boghammar vessel. Once a target is acquired by the JCM seeker, it is not likely to escape," says Steve Barnoske, JCM program director at Lockheed Martin.

The software-and-simulation review confirmed the maturity of the JCM software, including critical target recognition algorithms adapted from the Longbow program, which, with the MMW and I2R sensors, enable JCM to distinguish targets from non-targets.

The JCM is the multipurpose, air-to-ground missile that will replace U.S. Army and Navy Hellfire, Longbow, and Maverick air-to-ground missiles. For more information contact Lockheed Martin online at www.lockheedmartin.com.

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