NSA approves Kasten Chase security cards

Officials of the U.S. National Security Agency in Washington approved PCMCIA-based Fortezza secure remote access cards from Kasten Chase Applied Research Ltd. in Reston, Va., for use in government projects. The Kasten Chase cards, called RASP Secure Access, are cleared to access U.S. government secret networks, Kasten Chase officials say. The first release of two important RASP components — the OPtiva Secure Plus remote access server and the Rainbow Technologies Palladium(TM) Secure Modem &

Aug 1st, 1999

Officials of the U.S. National Security Agency in Washington approved PCMCIA-based Fortezza secure remote access cards from Kasten Chase Applied Research Ltd. in Reston, Va., for use in government projects. The Kasten Chase cards, called RASP Secure Access, are cleared to access U.S. government secret networks, Kasten Chase officials say. The first release of two important RASP components — the OPtiva Secure Plus remote access server and the Rainbow Technologies Palladium(TM) Secure Modem — have completed all NAS technical and security tests. RASP offers authentication, link encryption, and desktop data protection against unauthorized viewing of data moving along public telephone lines, and prevents unauthorized network access. For more information, contact Kasten Chase by phone at 703-715-3197, by fax at 703-471-0760, by post at 12110 Sunset Hills Road, Suite 450, Reston, Va. 22090, or on the World Wide Web at http://www.kastenchase.com/. — J.K.

More in Test