Textron to build test equipment for systems designed to detect and jam IEDs

U.S. Navy bomb- disposal experts are looking to the Textron Systems Electronic Systems segment in Hunt Valley, Md., to provide test and measurement equipment to validate the performance of equipment designed to jam radio-frequency (RF) and microwave signals that detonate improvised explosive devices (IEDs).

Oct 1st, 2016
1610mae Rfmicro Textron

INDIAN HEAD, Md. - U.S. Navy bomb- disposal experts are looking to the Textron Systems Electronic Systems segment in Hunt Valley, Md., to provide test and measurement equipment to validate the performance of equipment designed to jam radio-frequency (RF) and microwave signals that detonate improvised explosive devices (IEDs).

Officials of the Naval Explosive Ordnance Disposal Technology Division in Indian Head, Md., announced a $7.4 million order to Textron Electronic Systems to produce the AN/GLM-11 universal test set for IED jamming systems. The contract also calls for Textron to provide AN/GLM-11 engineering services and program and configuration management.

The order is for the second option for universal test set production. Two years ago, Textron won $27.3 million to produce versions 1 and 2 of the AN/GLM-11 universal test set.

The AN/GLM-11 is a portable, battery-powered, programmable, ruggedized RF test system designed to validate IED jamming equipment. The unit provides in-field testing for warfighters employing IED jammers prior to departure, Textron officials say.

The Textron AN/GLM-11 universal test set ensures that IED-detection equipment is functioning properly before operators take the field.

The AN/GLM-11 system executes preprogrammed test sequences that replicate threats and measures expected jammer responses. These measurements use the build emitter, build measurement, and build se- quence applications of the AN/GLM- 11. An operator display on the AN/GLM-11 automatically provides the operator with go/no-go test results. Under a password option, advanced users also can call up a spectral display of the jammer response.

The AN/GLM-11 can test many communications and communications-jamming systems deployed worldwide, and has a frequency range sufficient for current and future counter-radio-controlled IED electronic warfare (CREW) jammers. The unit's stimulus modulation can provide continuous wave; AM and FM; amplitude-shift keying; phase-shift keying; frequency-shift keying; minimum-shift keying; and Gaussian minimum-shift keying waveforms, and can modulate the carrier signal with dual-tone, multi-frequency, tone, digital code, and arbitrary waveform.

Textron will do the work in Hunt Valley, Md., and should be finished by September 2017.

FOR MORE INFORMATION visit Textron Electronic Systems online at www.textronsystems.com.

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