Adequate due diligence thwarts counterfeiters’ efforts

SAN DIEGO, 4 June 2010. Counterfeiting capabilities have improved dramatically since 2006, revealed Leon Hamiter, chairman of Components Technology Institute Inc., at the Military & Aerospace Electronics Forum in San Diego. In his talk, “Avoiding counterfeits in the supply chain,” he admitted that it is a constant fight to stay current with the tactics counterfeiters are using, and it is increasingly difficult to detect counterfeit parts.

Jun 4th, 2010

Posted by Courtney E. Howard

SAN DIEGO, 4 June 2010.Counterfeiting capabilities have improved dramatically since 2006, revealed Leon Hamiter, chairman of Components Technology Institute Inc., at the Military & Aerospace Electronics Forum in San Diego. In his talk, “Avoiding counterfeits in the supply chain,” he admitted that it is a constant fight to stay current with the tactics counterfeiters are using, and it is increasingly difficult to detect counterfeit components.

Counterfeiting is not just happening overseas, either; there is reason to believe a few organizations are doing it here in the U.S., Hamiter admits.

“Do adequate due diligence to inspect components,” Hamiter recommends. He defines due diligence as: “taking of reasonable steps by a person or business to satisfy legal requirements in buying or selling something.”

Hamiter advises the following:
- Making sure your suppliers have an effective counterfeit avoidance program
- Using contracts that specify adequate time to authenticate; inform seller counterfeits will not be paid for or returned, but proof will be provided
- Documenting procedures on all levels of inspection and test performed


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