D/A converter fast enough for advanced electronic warfare introduced by Tektronix

BEAVERTON, Ore., 29 March 2013. Tektronix Component Solutions in Beaverton, Ore., is introducing the TDAC-25 10-bit commercial digital-to-analog converter (D/A converter), which at 25 gigasamples per second is what company officials claim is the world's fastest D/A converter.

Mar 29th, 2013
D/A converter fast enough for advanced electronic warfare systems introduced by Tektronix
D/A converter fast enough for advanced electronic warfare systems introduced by Tektronix

BEAVERTON, Ore., 29 March 2013 2013. Tektronix Component Solutions in Beaverton, Ore., is introducing the TDAC-25 10-bit commercial digital-to-analog converter (D/A converter), which at 25 gigasamples per second is what company officials claim is the world's fastest D/A converter.

The TDAC-25 is of particular interest in defense applications because of its low-latency where it can deliver the fast response needed for electronic warfare (EW) systems, Tektronix officials say.

The TDAC-25 25-gigasample-per-second application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) is for use in next-generation embedded systems in such areas as defense, commercial aerospace, medical, and coherent optical communications.

The TDAC-25 D/A converter offers dynamic ranges to -80 dBc narrowband and -60 dBc wideband. In RF-based applications, it supports direct-generation of wideband signals to enable systems designers to eliminate D/A converter arrays and frequency conversion blocks.

The TDAC-25 already has been designed into two next-generation systems under development, including Curtiss-Wright Controls Defense Solutions CHAMP-WB-DRFM a 6U Virtex-7 VPX module.

In coherent optical communications applications and research, the device's 10-bit resolution provides a large effective number of bits (ENOB) and enables the high resolution required by advanced modulation schemes.

For more information contact Tektronix Component Solutions online at http://component-solutions.tek.com.

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