Eight contractors chosen for $7.2 billion DMEA ATSP4 program to fight electronics obsolescence

MC CLELLAN, Calif., 1 April 2016. U.S. military microelectronics experts are choosing eight major U.S. defense contractors for a potential $7.2 billion 12-year program to fight the effects of electronics obsolescence and solve problems of unreliable, unmaintainable, under-performing, or incapable electronics hardware and software.

Three small businesses chosen for $$800 million DMEA ATSP4 SB program to fight electronics obsolescence
Three small businesses chosen for $$800 million DMEA ATSP4 SB program to fight electronics obsolescence
MC CLELLAN, Calif., 1 April 2016. U.S. military microelectronics experts are choosing eight major U.S. defense contractors for a potential $7.2 billion 12-year program to fight the effects of electronics obsolescence and solve problems of unreliable, unmaintainable, under-performing, or incapable electronics hardware and software.

Officials of the Defense Microelectronics Activity (DMEA) in McClellan, Calif., announced contracts to the eight companies Thursday for the Advanced Technology Support Program IV (ATSP4).

The eight ATSP4 contractors named Thursday are:

-- BAE Systems Electronic Systems in Nashua, N.H.;
-- The Boeing Co. in Hazelwood, Mo.;
-- The Lockheed Martin Corp. Mission Systems and Training (MST) segment in Owego, N.Y.;
-- Cobham Semiconductor Solutions in Colorado Springs, Colo. (formerly Aeroflex);
-- General Dynamics Mission Systems in Minneapolis;
-- Honeywell Aerospace in Albuquerque, N.M.;
-- The Northrop Grumman Corp. Mission Systems segment in Linthicum Heights, Md.; and
-- the Raytheon Co. Space and Airborne Systems segment in El Segundo, Calif.

Related: Global war on terrorism intensifies the problem of obsolete parts

These companies will share as much as $7.2 billion worth of orders over 10 years of potential ordering, DMEA officials say. Orders will support U.S. military technology and weapons development, as well as those of foreign militaries.

The contracts announced Thursday are for the larger of two initiatives under the ATSP4 program. Contracts for a second potential $800 million project as part of this program are reserved for small business, and have not yet been announced.

The ATSP4 seeks to develop a quick reaction capability to develop technologies necessary to keep a military systems operational, elevate their sophistication levels, and meet new threats.

ATSP4 orders may include developing components to meet the Pentagon's requirements for ultra-low volumes, extending component availability, or ensuring a trusted, assured, and secure supply of microelectronics.

Related: DoD picks seven companies to supply advanced technologies

The job also involves the quick application of advanced technologies to upgrade military weapons performance in response to traditional and irregular threats, as well as to the problems of aging weapon systems.

The ATSP4 program seeks to increase warfighter capabilities and solve electronics support problems like reliability, maintainability, and obsolescence by inserting advanced microelectronics into weapon systems.

The ATSP4 program covers hardware and software and includes studies, analysis, design, software, simulation, prototyping, integration, testing, producibility, and limited production.

On the ATSP4 program the contractors will do the work a their own locations, and should be finished will all work by March 2028. For more information contact the DMEA online at www.dmea.osd.mil.

More in Computers