Northrop Grumman to develop automatic target recognition to help Navy aircraft attack enemy ships in port

CHINA LAKE NAVAL AIR WEAPONS STATION, Calif., 12 Dec. 2010. Military radar experts at the Northrop Grumman Corp. Electronic Systems sector in Linthicum Heights, Md., are designing a radar-based automatic target recognition system to help U.S. Navy aircraft quickly identify and attack enemy ships at anchor. The Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Division at China Lake Naval Air Weapons Station, Calif., awarded Northrop Grumman a $1.1 million research contract last week for the Radar Ships-in-Port Discriminator (R-SIP-D) program.

Dec 12th, 2010
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CHINA LAKE NAVAL AIR WEAPONS STATION, Calif., 12 Dec. 2010.Military radar experts at the Northrop Grumman Corp. Electronic Systems sector in Linthicum Heights, Md., are designing a radar-based automatic target recognition system to help U.S. Navy aircraft quickly identify and attack enemy ships at anchor. The Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Division at China Lake Naval Air Weapons Station, Calif., awarded Northrop Grumman a $1.1 million research contract last week for the Radar Ships-in-Port Discriminator (R-SIP-D) program.

The R-SIP-D program seeks to develop an X-band radar-based aided target recognition (AiTR) systems able to that will provide automatic target identification of enemy ships in port to enable Navy aircraft to attack them before the hostile ships have a chance to escape from harm's way.

The Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Division is working together with the Office of Naval Research in Arlington, Va., on the R-SIP- D program as an advanced technology demonstration of AiTR technology able automatically to identify radar data of ships in port that are secured to a dock so naval aircraft and missiles can attack them quickly.

The latency of the kill chain from collection of data, extraction of target information, distribution of information, and action based on the information is a bottleneck of modern mobile warfare, Navy officials explain. The R-SIP-D program seeks to speed the process from target detection to target attack.

For more information contact the Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Division online at www.navair.navy.mil/nawcwd, or Northrop Grumman Electronic Systems at www.es.northropgrumman.com.

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