Stilman to apply DARPA RAID technology to Army FBCB2 battle-management program

DENVER, 21 Nov. 2007. Stilman Advanced Strategies LLC in Denver won a 2-year U.S. Army contract to extend and integrate a novel real-time running-estimate technology with the Army Force XXI Battle Command Brigade and Below (FBCB2) system, and to demonstrate the technology in Army experiments such as the Air Assault Expeditionary Force (AAEF).

DENVER, 21 Nov. 2007. Stilman Advanced Strategies LLC in Denver won a 2-year U.S. Army contract to extend and integrate a novel real-time running-estimate technology with the Army Force XXI Battle Command Brigade and Below (FBCB2) system, and to demonstrate the technology in Army experiments such as the Air Assault Expeditionary Force (AAEF).

Based on the Real-time Adversarial Intelligence and Decision-making (RAID) program of the U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), the module will operate as an experimental application linked with the Army FBCB2 system, accessible to commanders and staff at the battalion and company level.

This module will include Stilman's core Linguistic Geometry (LG) technology, which is focused on real-time anticipation of enemy actions; it will provide the commanders and their staffs with potential enemy "future tracks" and enable them to wargame the situation for several alternative assumptions.

It will also enable the human-in-the-loop rapidly to investigate "what-ifs" for all the sides in the conflict by computing their outcome in compressed time. This capability will cover a wide class of operations, including operations in urban, mountain, wooded, and other complex environments.

Before and during mission execution, RAID continuously reads information from FBCB2, such as friendly force locations and enemy spot reports. It also receives input and assumptions from the battalion staff or company commander; it may also read and reason on voluminous data, like SIGACTs (significant activity reports) in the region, if they are available from appropriate databases.

Taking all this data, RAID combines them and generates and displays running estimates of the enemy's current and future situation and intent, including several "future tracks" alternatives (most dangerous, most likely, etc.), probable locations of IEDs, likely locations of ambushes, concealed enemy positions, routes of infiltration or retreat, etc. This capability has already been partially demonstrated in several command-post experiments and in a live-force experiment.

For more information contact Stilman Advanced Strategies online at www.stilman-strategies.com.

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