Army receives 1000th Stryker vehicle

ANNISTON, Ala., 13 January 2005. Yesterday, the U.S. Army and General Dynamics Land Systems recognized the delivery of the 1000th Stryker armored vehicle during a ceremony at the Anniston Army Depot in Anniston, Ala.

ANNISTON, Ala., 13 January 2005. Yesterday, the U.S. Army and General Dynamics Land Systems recognized the delivery of the 1000th Stryker armored vehicle during a ceremony at the Anniston Army Depot in Anniston, Ala.

Stryker is an eight-wheel armored vehicle that is changing the way warfare is conducted on the battlefield.

Stryker is an essential element of the Army's effort to transform itself into a more agile, deployable, survivable, and lethal force. The Stryker family of vehicles, including 10 variants, is assembled at the Army's Anniston Army Depot, Anniston, Ala., and at General Dynamics Land Systems' facility in London, Ontario.

"Only four years ago, Stryker was a vision of then Army Chief of Staff Eric Shinseki," said Charles M. Hall, president, General Dynamics Land Systems. "Today, we are recognizing the 1000th Stryker that is continually proving the Army's vision correct as it provides its soldiers a new operational capability required to defend the democratic principles of freedom in today's uncertain world."

"Stryker is a real success story for the Army. We have demonstrated and proven that the DoD can rapidly produce, field and deploy new and effective weapons system very quickly," said Lieutenant General Joseph Yakovac, Jr., Military deputy to the Assistant Secretary of the Army for Acquisition, Logistics & Technology. "The Stryker family of vehicles has proven their worth. They are quickly deployable and extremely survivable."

In their 12 months of deployment in Iraq with the 3/2 Infantry, the Strykers were driven over 3.1 million miles and encountered over 200 hostile incidents. Through all of this they maintained an operational readiness rate in excess of 96 percent.

"Stryker provides the survivability and lethality that ensures our soldiers complete their mission quickly, safely and decisively. The Stryker is an example of the Army's effort to transform itself into a more agile, deployable and lethal force," said Lieutenant General Yakovac.

General Dynamics, headquartered in Falls Church, Va., employs approximately 71,600 people worldwide and anticipates 2004 revenue in excess of $19 billion. The company is a market leader in mission-critical information systems and technologies; land and expeditionary combat systems, armaments and munitions; shipbuilding and marine systems; and business aviation. For more information see www.generaldynamics.com.

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