Small gyro-stabilized electro-optical sensor payload for UAVs introduced by Octopus ISR

RIGA, Latvia – Octopus ISR Systems in Riga, Latvia, is introducing the Epsilon 175 small gyro-stabilized electro-optical four-sensor payload for unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), which weighs 5.7 pounds, and measures 6.8 by 8.1 inches.

Jun 5th, 2017
By Mil & Aero staff
By Mil & Aero staff

RIGA, Latvia – Octopus ISR Systems in Riga, Latvia, is introducing the Epsilon 175 small gyro-stabilized electro-optical four-sensor payload for unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), which weighs 5.7 pounds, and measures 6.8 by 8.1 inches.

The medium wavelength infrared (MWIR) gimbal has a 30x optical zoom electro-optical (EO) sensor, 15x optical zoom MWIR sensor, laser range finder, and laser illuminator, this gimbal is an ideal choice for unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) used for border control, military purposes, and a variety of civil applications.

"This new development unlocks totally different capabilities for Tactical UAVs under 55 pounds where maximum payload size and weight constraints limit payload performance," says Konstantins Krivovs, the Octopus ISR systems business development manager.

"Using the Epsilon 175, small UAV manufacturers can expand their operations by being able to gather and deliver higher-quality and more accurate data," Krivovs continues. "This type of equipment also enables tactical UAVs to fulfill certain missions that were traditionally fulfilled by medium-altitude long-endurance UAVs with the same quality and at a much lower cost."

Related: Electro-optical sensor payloads for small UAVs

The Epsilon 175 decreases the weight of the sensor payload, which increases UAV endurance to enable longer missions or more spare capacity for other equipment, Octopus officials say.

The UAV sensor payload operates in temperatures from -40 to 50 degrees Celsius; offers 360 degrees of continuous pan, as well as -90 degrees to 30 degrees elevation; a slew rate of 120 degrees per second, and typically uses 35 Watts of power.

Its infrared sensor uses a 3-to-5 micron cooled staring array, has an 18-to-275-millimeter 15x zoom lens with a 24.5-by-1.5-degree vertical field of view, 640-by-512-pixel resolution, and runs at 30 frames per second.

For more information contact Octopus ISR Systems online at http://octopus.uavfactory.com.

Learn more: search the Aerospace & Defense Buyer's Guide for companies, new products, press releases, and videos

More in Unmanned